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Homework due Tuesday the 22nd/Wednesday the 23rd

Assignment 1 of 3:
Type a final draft of your Personality and Career Matchup Paragraph.  
 
Here is the order of assignments to turn in at the beginning of class Tuesday/Wednesday:
 
Typed final draft (12-point Times New Roman font, double-spaced)
Rough Draft
Peer Editing Form
Outline
 
 
Assignment 2 of 3 (ongoing): 
If you haven't already done so, complete TWO Achieve 3000 lessons of your choice over the break.  Do the following for both articles by 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 8th:
 
Before Reading Poll: Answer the question (do NOT skip if you don't have enough information) and explain your answer in one sentence
Read the article
Write two summaries (two sentences each) at the middle and end of the article
Write three questions for a quiz on the article
Take the activity quiz
 
Make sure you write down the titles of your Achieve 3000 lessons, your quiz scores, and the dates you completed them on the handout you were given before break.  If you were absent, find a digital copy of this handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
 
Assignment 3 of 3 (ongoing):
If you want two whole months to finish reading, you have until Friday, Feb. 1st to get the book for your Independent Reading Project (IRP) approved.  Use the break to search for a book rather than waiting until it is too late (absolute last day for approvals is Friday, April 12th).
 
A shortened list of rules for choosing your IRP book is below, but if you were absent you should look over the digital copy of the IRP handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
Your IRP book ...
MUST have a single narrative (but can be either fiction or nonfiction ... no poetry, short stories, plays, screenplays, comic books)
MUST be age- and school-appropriate (no kiddie books!)
MUST be 200 or more pages
MUST be a stand-alone work (no prequels, sequels, other books in a series)
MUST NOT have any film, TV, or computer/video game tie-ins
MUST NOT be part of past or present curricula at Gertz or Merkin
MUST NOT be more than 100 points below your lexile level from the August test (instructions for determining this number below)
 
How do I get my book approved?
Provide me (in person or via email) the title and author of your book + screenshots of your lexile level and the book's lexile level.  If no one else has already taken the book, it will be yours.
 
How do I find my correct lexile level?
You should've written it on the form I gave you at the beginning of the semester. If you've lost this paper, go to Achieve 3000's website.  Log in to the class that has "Shimizu" and "LevelSet" in the title.  Your lexile level will be shown as a horizontal green bar on the homepage.
 
What if I entered Gertz late and didn't take the LevelSet test in August?
If I haven't already assigned you a lexile level, email me to get your score.  Otherwise, you may wait until after Jan. 14th to start your search.
 
What if I don't want to deal with all these rules?
If you select a book from the AP list attached as a link to this site (or on Google Classroom), or can produce proof of your book, you can ignore the ban on books with film adaptations, lexile levels 100+ points below your score, and pages less than 200.
 
What if I cannot find the lexile level of my book on lexile.com?
Try looking on the following sites: goodreads.com, bookwizard.net, barnesandnoble.com, amazon.com ... If you still run into difficulty, you must bring the book in to me so I can look through it personally.
 
 

Homework due Thursday the 16th/Friday the 17th

Assignment 1 of 3:
Complete a rough draft of your Personality and Career Matchup Paragraph (the front side with all the boxes and the back side with the sentence frames).  That way, you can spend the next class peer editing and typing up your final draft the first hour.
 
 
Assignment 2 of 3 (ongoing): 
If you haven't already done so, complete TWO Achieve 3000 lessons of your choice over the break.  Do the following for both articles by 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 8th:
 
Before Reading Poll: Answer the question (do NOT skip if you don't have enough information) and explain your answer in one sentence
Read the article
Write two summaries (two sentences each) at the middle and end of the article
Write three questions for a quiz on the article
Take the activity quiz
 
Make sure you write down the titles of your Achieve 3000 lessons, your quiz scores, and the dates you completed them on the handout you were given before break.  If you were absent, find a digital copy of this handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
 
Assignment 3 of 3 (ongoing):
If you want two whole months to finish reading, you have until Friday, Feb. 1st to get the book for your Independent Reading Project (IRP) approved.  Use the break to search for a book rather than waiting until it is too late (absolute last day for approvals is Friday, April 12th).
 
A shortened list of rules for choosing your IRP book is below, but if you were absent you should look over the digital copy of the IRP handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
Your IRP book ...
MUST have a single narrative (but can be either fiction or nonfiction ... no poetry, short stories, plays, screenplays, comic books)
MUST be age- and school-appropriate (no kiddie books!)
MUST be 200 or more pages
MUST be a stand-alone work (no prequels, sequels, other books in a series)
MUST NOT have any film, TV, or computer/video game tie-ins
MUST NOT be part of past or present curricula at Gertz or Merkin
MUST NOT be more than 100 points below your lexile level from the August test (instructions for determining this number below)
 
How do I get my book approved?
Provide me (in person or via email) the title and author of your book + screenshots of your lexile level and the book's lexile level.  If no one else has already taken the book, it will be yours.
 
How do I find my correct lexile level?
You should've written it on the form I gave you at the beginning of the semester. If you've lost this paper, go to Achieve 3000's website.  Log in to the class that has "Shimizu" and "LevelSet" in the title.  Your lexile level will be shown as a horizontal green bar on the homepage.
 
What if I entered Gertz late and didn't take the LevelSet test in August?
If I haven't already assigned you a lexile level, email me to get your score.  Otherwise, you may wait until after Jan. 14th to start your search.
 
What if I don't want to deal with all these rules?
If you select a book from the AP list attached as a link to this site (or on Google Classroom), or can produce proof of your book, you can ignore the ban on books with film adaptations, lexile levels 100+ points below your score, and pages less than 200.
 
What if I cannot find the lexile level of my book on lexile.com?
Try looking on the following sites: goodreads.com, bookwizard.net, barnesandnoble.com, amazon.com ... If you still run into difficulty, you must bring the book in to me so I can look through it personally.
 
 

Homework due Wednesday the 16th

Assignment 1 of 3:
Complete both parts of the outline for your Personality and Career Matchup Paragraph (the front side with all the boxes and the back side with the sentence frames).  That way, you can begin working right away on your rough draft once you get to class.
 
If you are already done with your outline, please start your rough draft before Wednesday's class.  You will have class time to finish your rough draft, peer edit your rough draft, and possibly start typing your final draft.
 
 
Assignment 2 of 3 (ongoing): 
 
If you haven't already done so, complete TWO Achieve 3000 lessons of your choice over the break.  Do the following for both articles by 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 8th:
 
Before Reading Poll: Answer the question (do NOT skip if you don't have enough information) and explain your answer in one sentence
Read the article
Write two summaries (two sentences each) at the middle and end of the article
Write three questions for a quiz on the article
Take the activity quiz
 
Make sure you write down the titles of your Achieve 3000 lessons, your quiz scores, and the dates you completed them on the handout you were given before break.  If you were absent, find a digital copy of this handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
 
Assignment 3 of 3 (ongoing):
If you want two whole months to finish reading, you have until Friday, Feb. 1st to get the book for your Independent Reading Project (IRP) approved.  Use the break to search for a book rather than waiting until it is too late (absolute last day for approvals is Friday, April 12th).
 
A shortened list of rules for choosing your IRP book is below, but if you were absent you should look over the digital copy of the IRP handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
Your IRP book ...
MUST have a single narrative (but can be either fiction or nonfiction ... no poetry, short stories, plays, screenplays, comic books)
MUST be age- and school-appropriate (no kiddie books!)
MUST be 200 or more pages
MUST be a stand-alone work (no prequels, sequels, other books in a series)
MUST NOT have any film, TV, or computer/video game tie-ins
MUST NOT be part of past or present curricula at Gertz or Merkin
MUST NOT be more than 100 points below your lexile level from the August test (instructions for determining this number below)
 
How do I get my book approved?
Provide me (in person or via email) the title and author of your book + screenshots of your lexile level and the book's lexile level.  If no one else has already taken the book, it will be yours.
 
How do I find my correct lexile level?
You should've written it on the form I gave you at the beginning of the semester. If you've lost this paper, go to Achieve 3000's website.  Log in to the class that has "Shimizu" and "LevelSet" in the title.  Your lexile level will be shown as a horizontal green bar on the homepage.
 
What if I entered Gertz late and didn't take the LevelSet test in August?
If I haven't already assigned you a lexile level, email me to get your score.  Otherwise, you may wait until after Jan. 14th to start your search.
 
What if I don't want to deal with all these rules?
If you select a book from the AP list attached as a link to this site (or on Google Classroom), or can produce proof of your book, you can ignore the ban on books with film adaptations, lexile levels 100+ points below your score, and pages less than 200.
 
What if I cannot find the lexile level of my book on lexile.com?
Try looking on the following sites: goodreads.com, bookwizard.net, barnesandnoble.com, amazon.com ... If you still run into difficulty, you must bring the book in to me so I can look through it personally.
 
 

Homework due Monday the 14th/Tuesday the 15th

Assignment 1 of 4:
Over the weekend, complete both parts of the outline for your Personality and Career Matchup Paragraph (the front side with all the boxes and the back side with the sentence frames).  That way, you can begin working right away on your rough draft once you finish your LevelSet test.
 
 
Assignment 2 of 4 (ongoing): 
Complete both sides of the Career Awareness and Interest Inventory questionnaire you were given in class if it's not finished already.  See the posting for homework due Thursday the 10th/Friday the 11th for fuller instructions.
 
 
 
Assignment 3 of 4 (ongoing):
If you haven't already done so, complete TWO Achieve 3000 lessons of your choice over the break.  Do the following for both articles by 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 8th:
 
Before Reading Poll: Answer the question (do NOT skip if you don't have enough information) and explain your answer in one sentence
Read the article
Write two summaries (two sentences each) at the middle and end of the article
Write three questions for a quiz on the article
Take the activity quiz
 
Make sure you write down the titles of your Achieve 3000 lessons, your quiz scores, and the dates you completed them on the handout you were given before break.  If you were absent, find a digital copy of this handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
 
Assignment 4 of 4 (ongoing):
If you want two whole months to finish reading, you have until Friday, Feb. 1st to get the book for your Independent Reading Project (IRP) approved.  Use the break to search for a book rather than waiting until it is too late (absolute last day for approvals is Friday, April 12th).
 
A shortened list of rules for choosing your IRP book is below, but if you were absent you should look over the digital copy of the IRP handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
Your IRP book ...
MUST have a single narrative (but can be either fiction or nonfiction ... no poetry, short stories, plays, screenplays, comic books)
MUST be age- and school-appropriate (no kiddie books!)
MUST be 200 or more pages
MUST be a stand-alone work (no prequels, sequels, other books in a series)
MUST NOT have any film, TV, or computer/video game tie-ins
MUST NOT be part of past or present curricula at Gertz or Merkin
MUST NOT be more than 100 points below your lexile level from the August test (instructions for determining this number below)
 
How do I get my book approved?
Provide me (in person or via email) the title and author of your book + screenshots of your lexile level and the book's lexile level.  If no one else has already taken the book, it will be yours.
 
How do I find my correct lexile level?
You should've written it on the form I gave you at the beginning of the semester. If you've lost this paper, go to Achieve 3000's website.  Log in to the class that has "Shimizu" and "LevelSet" in the title.  Your lexile level will be shown as a horizontal green bar on the homepage.
 
What if I entered Gertz late and didn't take the LevelSet test in August?
If I haven't already assigned you a lexile level, email me to get your score.  Otherwise, you may wait until after Jan. 14th to start your search.
 
What if I don't want to deal with all these rules?
If you select a book from the AP list attached as a link to this site (or on Google Classroom), or can produce proof of your book, you can ignore the ban on books with film adaptations, lexile levels 100+ points below your score, and pages less than 200.
 
What if I cannot find the lexile level of my book on lexile.com?
Try looking on the following sites: goodreads.com, bookwizard.net, barnesandnoble.com, amazon.com ... If you still run into difficulty, you must bring the book in to me so I can look through it personally.
 
 

Homework due Thursday the 10th/Friday the 11th

Assignment 1 of 3:
Complete both sides of the Career Awareness and Interest Inventory questionnaire you were given in class.  Use the photos you took on your iPad of the last slide to help you fill in the back side (the slide provides interests for each career cluster in italics and a list of careers attached to that specific cluster).  Follow the instructions given.
 
FRONT SIDE (should've been done in class):
Step 1:
Going row by row, answer the 64 questions with a "Y" for yes or a "N" for no by first putting "Would you like to ...?" before each question.
Step 2:
Add up how many times you answered "yes" per row and write the number into the far right column next to the letters A through H.
Step 3:
Identify which two rows end with the same letter.  For example, the rows that start with questions 1 and 9 both end with the letter A.
Step 4: 
Add the two totals for A together and record this total down at the bottom of the page.
Step 5:
Circle the highest total and second highest total.  If two letters have the same total, you may have four letters circled (e.g., B and H have 6 and C and G have 5).
 
CAREER CLUSTERS BY LETTER
A= Agriculture
B= Arts, Media, Entertainment
C= Business
D= Engineering technology
E= Health
F= Home economics and technology
G= Industrial technology
H= Public health and human services
 
 
Assignment 2 of 3:
If you haven't already done so, complete TWO Achieve 3000 lessons of your choice over the break.  Do the following for both articles by 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 8th:
 
Before Reading Poll: Answer the question (do NOT skip if you don't have enough information) and explain your answer in one sentence
Read the article
Write two summaries (two sentences each) at the middle and end of the article
Write three questions for a quiz on the article
Take the activity quiz
 
Make sure you write down the titles of your Achieve 3000 lessons, your quiz scores, and the dates you completed them on the handout you were given before break.  If you were absent, find a digital copy of this handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
 
Assignment 3 of 3:
If you want two whole months to finish reading, you have until Friday, Feb. 1st to get the book for your Independent Reading Project (IRP) approved.  Use the break to search for a book rather than waiting until it is too late (absolute last day for approvals is Friday, April 12th).
 
A shortened list of rules for choosing your IRP book is below, but if you were absent you should look over the digital copy of the IRP handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
Your IRP book ...
MUST have a single narrative (but can be either fiction or nonfiction ... no poetry, short stories, plays, screenplays, comic books)
MUST be age- and school-appropriate (no kiddie books!)
MUST be 200 or more pages
MUST be a stand-alone work (no prequels, sequels, other books in a series)
MUST NOT have any film, TV, or computer/video game tie-ins
MUST NOT be part of past or present curricula at Gertz or Merkin
MUST NOT be more than 100 points below your lexile level from the August test (instructions for determining this number below)
 
How do I get my book approved?
Provide me (in person or via email) the title and author of your book + screenshots of your lexile level and the book's lexile level.  If no one else has already taken the book, it will be yours.
 
How do I find my correct lexile level?
You should've written it on the form I gave you at the beginning of the semester. If you've lost this paper, go to Achieve 3000's website.  Log in to the class that has "Shimizu" and "LevelSet" in the title.  Your lexile level will be shown as a horizontal green bar on the homepage.
 
What if I entered Gertz late and didn't take the LevelSet test in August?
If I haven't already assigned you a lexile level, email me to get your score.  Otherwise, you may wait until after Jan. 14th to start your search.
 
What if I don't want to deal with all these rules?
If you select a book from the AP list attached as a link to this site (or on Google Classroom), or can produce proof of your book, you can ignore the ban on books with film adaptations, lexile levels 100+ points below your score, and pages less than 200.
 
What if I cannot find the lexile level of my book on lexile.com?
Try looking on the following sites: goodreads.com, bookwizard.net, barnesandnoble.com, amazon.com ... If you still run into difficulty, you must bring the book in to me so I can look through it personally.
 
 

Winter Break Homework due Wednesday, Jan. 9th

Assignment 1 of 2:
Select TWO Achieve 3000 lessons of your choice to do over the break.  Do the following for both articles by 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 8th:
 
Before Reading Poll: Answer the question (do NOT skip if you don't have enough information) and explain your answer in one sentence
Read the article
Write two summaries (two sentences each) at the middle and end of the article
Write three questions for a quiz on the article
Take the activity quiz
 
Make sure you write down the titles of your Achieve 3000 lessons, your quiz scores, and the dates you completed them on the handout you were given before break.  If you were absent, find a digital copy of this handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
 
Assignment 2 of 2:
If you want two whole months to finish, you have until Friday, Feb. 1st to get the book for your Independent Reading Project (IRP) approved.  Use the break to search for a book rather than waiting until it is too late (absolute last day for approvals is Friday, April 12th).
 
A shortened list of rules for choosing your IRP book is below, but if you were absent you should look over the digital copy of the IRP handout on Google Classroom (or email me if you do not have access to Google Classroom).
 
Your IRP book ...
MUST have a single narrative (but can be either fiction or nonfiction ... no poetry, short stories, plays, screenplays, comic books)
MUST be age- and school-appropriate (no kiddie books!)
MUST be 200 or more pages
MUST be a stand-alone work (no prequels, sequels, other books in a series)
MUST NOT have any film, TV, or computer/video game tie-ins
MUST NOT be part of past or present curricula at Gertz or Merkin
MUST NOT be more than 100 points below your lexile level from the August test (instructions for determining this number below)
 
How do I get my book approved?
Provide me (in person or via email) the title and author of your book + screenshots of your lexile level and the book's lexile level.  If no one else has already taken the book, it will be yours.
 
How do I find my correct lexile level?
You should've written it on the form I gave you at the beginning of the semester. If you've lost this paper, go to Achieve 3000's website.  Log in to the class that has "Shimizu" and "LevelSet" in the title.  Your lexile level will be shown as a horizontal green bar on the homepage.
 
What if I entered Gertz late and didn't take the LevelSet test in August?
If I haven't already assigned you a lexile level, email me to get your score.  Otherwise, you may wait until after Jan. 14th to start your search.
 
What if I don't want to deal with all these rules?
If you select a book from the AP list attached as a link to this site (or on Google Classroom), or can produce proof of your book, you can ignore the ban on books with film adaptations, lexile levels 100+ points below your score, and pages less than 200.
 
What if I cannot find the lexile level of my book on lexile.com?
Try looking on the following sites: goodreads.com, bookwizard.net, barnesandnoble.com, amazon.com ... If you still run into difficulty, you must bring the book in to me so I can look through it personally.
 
 

Homework due the day of your final

NOTE: In order to use the second graphic organizer for "The Hamilton Mixtape", your outline for SCR 2 and/or your annotated copy of the text on your final, you must have your name written clearly on ALL THREE documents.  Not having your name on any one of these will result in them being taken away from you.  The same rules apply for your index card.
 
Assignment 1 of 4: 
Finish the outline for the second paragraph of your final.  You will be allowed to use this outline as a resource when taking the written portion of your final (first hour of the period).  
 
Prompt
What character trait of Alexander Hamilton’s does Lin-Manuel Miranda consider most notable? How does he use specific poetic devices in “The Hamilton Mixtape” to highlight this trait for audiences?
 
• Focus on ONE significant character trait Hamilton exhibits.
• Identify TWO different poetic devices Miranda uses in the song.
• Use ONE quote from the text as an example of each poetic device
• Connect BOTH quotes (both examples of poetic devices being used) to the character trait you chose.
 
Before Writing …
• Step 1: Think about all the traits Miranda uses to describe Hamilton in the song, then pick just ONE that Miranda emphasizes above the rest. 
• Step 2: Find quotes that support this trait in the text. (The best quotes to use will show use of multiple poetic devices)
• Step 3: Determine what poetic devices Miranda uses in these quotes.
• Step 4: Pick TWO poetic devices used in your quotes to focus on (there may be several).
• Step 5: Make sure you have ONE strong quote from the text for EACH poetic device.
 
 
Assignment 2 of 4:
 
Study for your finals!!!!!!!  That means rereading every text since August and studying your notes on each (annotations, definitions, Do Nows, graphic organizers, etc.).  A list of every text and the types of questions you may be asked is posted to Google Classroom.
 
Your multiple-choice final will be 50 questions long, with 2-5 questions for each of the texts we've read this year.  You will also have 2-4 questions on the material you studied for the Narrative Elements Quiz.  Questions will require you to know what happens in each story and be able to analyze passages from the text.  
 
You will write two CEL paragraphs on "The Hamilton Mixtape" as the written portion of your final.  The first paragraph will be worked on in the classes leading up to finals week.  The second will be completed the day of the final.  For the second, you will have access to your paragraph outline and annotated copy of the text.  I reserve the right to deny you access to either or both of these if you break the rules governing their use (wait for further information on this closer to finals week).
 
 
Assignment 3 of 4:
 
You will be allowed a 3x5" index card for the multiple-choice portion of the test.  You may fill both sides of the index card with any notes you want to have for this portion of your final.
 
In order to use this index card on the final, you must remember to bring it on the day of the final.  Not bringing it means you will have to redo it during the study hall period or go in blind.
 
Some students will earn the right to a second index card if they are part of the winning group at the end of the Finals Review Game on Monday.
 
Ways your index card will be taken from you:
1)  It has copied and pasted parts of your SCRs or of the texts with annotations.
2)  It is larger than 3x5"
3)  It does not have your name on it
4)  It has someone else's name on it (that's Ethics Committee for you both)
 
 
Assignment 4 of 4:
Prepare to turn in all the graphic organizers from Units 1 and 2 for extra credit next week (due date is the day of your final).
 
-Graphic Organizer for “Bread”
-Graphic Organizer for “The First Day”
-Graphic Organizer for “What Happened During the Ice Storm”
-Graphic Organizer for “Lamb to the Slaughter”
-Graphic Organizer for “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”
-Graphic Organizer for “Désirée’s Baby”
-Graphic Organizer for “Sonata for Harp and Bicycle”
-Graphic Organizer for “The Fight” (vulnerability of the eggs)
-Graphic Organizer for “The Hamilton Mixtape” (Parts 1 and 2)
 

Homework due Monday the 10th (all periods)

NOTE: In order to use the second graphic organizer for "The Hamilton Mixtape", your outline for SCR 2 and/or your annotated copy of the text on your final, you must have your name written clearly on ALL THREE documents.  Not having your name on any one of these will result in them being taken away from you.  The same rules apply for your index card.
 
Assignment 1 of 5: 
Work on questions for the Finals Review Game (six questions minimum, separated into "easy", "medium" and/or "hard" categories).  Please work together with two others in your class to create review questions for your assigned text.
 
Questions should be in short-answer format (i.e., not multiple-choice) and answerable in 20 seconds.  For example, do not ask questions like, "What word did Ambrose Bierce use to begin Section 2?"  
 
At the end of Monday's class, I should get one sheet of paper with all six questions and their answers.  The paper should list the names of everyone who contributed questions.  If you feel like one member of your group did not contribute enough to deserve credit, leave their name off the sheet.
 
 
Assignment 2 of 5:
Finish the outline for the second paragraph of your final before the day of the final.  You will be allowed to use this outline as a resource when taking the written portion of your final (first hour of the period).  
 
Prompt
What character trait of Alexander Hamilton’s does Lin-Manuel Miranda consider most notable? How does he use specific poetic devices in “The Hamilton Mixtape” to highlight this trait for audiences?
 
• Focus on ONE significant character trait Hamilton exhibits.
• Identify TWO different poetic devices Miranda uses in the song.
• Use ONE quote from the text as an example of each poetic device
• Connect BOTH quotes (both examples of poetic devices being used) to the character trait you chose.
 
Before Writing …
• Step 1: Think about all the traits Miranda uses to describe Hamilton in the song, then pick just ONE that Miranda emphasizes above the rest. 
• Step 2: Find quotes that support this trait in the text. (The best quotes to use will show use of multiple poetic devices)
• Step 3: Determine what poetic devices Miranda uses in these quotes.
• Step 4: Pick TWO poetic devices used in your quotes to focus on (there may be several).
• Step 5: Make sure you have ONE strong quote from the text for EACH poetic device.
 
 
Assignment 3 of 5:
Study for your finals!!!!!!!  That means rereading every text since August and studying your notes on each (annotations, definitions, Do Nows, graphic organizers, etc.).  A list of every text and the types of questions you may be asked is posted to Google Classroom.
 
Your multiple-choice final will be 50 questions long, with 2-5 questions for each of the texts we've read this year.  You will also have 2-4 questions on the material you studied for the Narrative Elements Quiz.  Questions will require you to know what happens in each story and be able to analyze passages from the text.  
 
You will write two CEL paragraphs on "The Hamilton Mixtape" as the written portion of your final.  The first paragraph will be worked on in the classes leading up to finals week.  The second will be completed the day of the final.  For the second, you will have access to your paragraph outline and annotated copy of the text.  I reserve the right to deny you access to either or both of these if you break the rules governing their use (wait for further information on this closer to finals week).
 
 
Assignment 4 of 5:
You will be allowed a 3x5" index card for the multiple-choice portion of the test.  You may fill both sides of the index card with any notes you want to have for this portion of your final.
 
In order to use this index card on the final, you must remember to bring it on the day of the final.  Not bringing it means you will have to redo it during the study hall period or go in blind.
 
Some students will earn the right to a second index card if they are part of the winning group at the end of the Finals Review Game on Monday.
 
Ways your index card will be taken from you:
1)  It has copied and pasted parts of your SCRs or of the texts with annotations.
2)  It is larger than 3x5"
3)  It does not have your name on it
4)  It has someone else's name on it (that's Ethics Committee for you both)
 
 
Assignment 5 of 5:
Prepare to turn in all the graphic organizers from Units 1 and 2 for extra credit next week (due date is the day of your final).
 
-Graphic Organizer for “Bread”
-Graphic Organizer for “The First Day”
-Graphic Organizer for “What Happened During the Ice Storm”
-Graphic Organizer for “Lamb to the Slaughter”
-Graphic Organizer for “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”
-Graphic Organizer for “Désirée’s Baby”
-Graphic Organizer for “Sonata for Harp and Bicycle”
-Graphic Organizer for “The Fight” (vulnerability of the eggs)
-Graphic Organizer for “The Hamilton Mixtape” (Parts 1 and 2)

Homework due Thursday the 6th/Friday the 7th

Assignment 1 of 5: 
Finish writing the first paragraph for your final (type it or handwrite it neatly in blue or black pen).  It will be due in final draft form at the beginning of class Thursday/Friday (you will have Wednesday to peer edit and revise it).  Use the sentence frames on the back of your graphic organizer to help you.
 
Pre-AP Semester 1 Final: SCR #1 Prompt:
How did the hardship Alexander Hamilton experienced early in his life impact his character?
---Focus on ONE significant character trait Hamilton exhibits.  
---Refer to TWO different events from his life before departing to America.
---Use TWO quotes connecting these life events to this characteristic
 
Before writing:
---Think about all the events Miranda brings up from Hamilton’s early life in the song, then pick just TWO that you feel have the most impact.
---Think about all the traits Miranda uses to describe Hamilton in the song, then pick just ONE that Miranda emphasizes above the rest.
---Make a connection between this trait and the two events.  If no connection exists, start over with either a new trait or a new set of quotes.
---Find quotes from the song that support the trait you’ve chosen to focus on.
 
 
Assignment 2 of 5:
Find TWO+ examples from "The Hamilton Mixtape" of each poetic device discussed in class.  Record your examples (and their connection to Hamilton's character) on the graphic organizer given out in class Monday/Tuesday.
 
You will use this to help you write/outline SCR 2 for the final.
 
 
Assignment 3 of 5:
Revise/Add answers to the following questions in the form of annotations on your copy of "The Hamilton Mixtape".  
 
What is Miranda setting up in the first four lines?
How does Hamilton set himself apart in this "forgotten spot"?  Use lines 5-15.
What major event happened to him as a teen and what was his response?  Use lines 16-22.
What happened once his community learned of his response?  Use lines 23-25.
What message comes across about Hamilton in lines 29-30?
What hardships did Hamilton face as a kid?  Use lines 31-38.
How did Hamilton "fend for [himself]" in lines 41-52?
Why do you think Miranda makes a point of describing Hamilton as an immigrant in lines 52-57?
What point is Miranda making through Aaron Burr's declarations in the hook?  Use lines 58-68 and connect what Burr says about Hamilton in the hook to the theme.
 
 
Assignment 4 of 5:
Prepare to turn in all the graphic organizers from Units 1 and 2 for extra credit next week (due date TBD).
 
-Graphic Organizer for “Bread”
-Graphic Organizer for “The First Day”
-Graphic Organizer for “What Happened During the Ice Storm”
-Graphic Organizer for “Lamb to the Slaughter”
-Graphic Organizer for “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”
-Graphic Organizer for “Désirée’s Baby”
-Graphic Organizer for “Sonata for Harp and Bicycle”
-Graphic Organizer for “The Fight” (vulnerability of the eggs)
-Graphic Organizer for “The Hamilton Mixtape”
 
 
Assignment 5 of 5:
Start studying for your finals.  That means rereading every text since August and studying your notes on each (annotations, definitions, Do Nows, graphic organizers, etc.).  A list of every text and the types of questions you may be asked will be posted to Google Classroom by the end of this week.
 
Your multiple-choice final will be 50 questions long, with 2-5 questions for each of the texts we've read this year.  You will also have 2-4 questions on the material you studied for the Narrative Elements Quiz.  Questions will require you to know what happens in each story and be able to analyze passages from the text.  You will be allowed a 2x3" index card with notes for this portion of the text (a few students will earn the right to a larger index card--details to come).
 
You will write two CEL paragraphs on "The Hamilton Mixtape" as the written portion of your final.  The first paragraph will be worked on in the classes leading up to finals week.  The second will be completed the day of the final.  For the second, you will have access to your paragraph outline and annotated copy of the text.  I reserve the right to deny you access to either or both of these if you break the rules governing their use (wait for further information on this closer to finals week).
 

Homework due Monday the 3rd/Tuesday the 4th

Assignment 1 of 5: 
Start writing the first paragraph for your final (note: you will have an hour of class on Monday/Tuesday for this also).  It will be due by the beginning of class Wednesday the 5th (so you can peer edit and revise it during the period).  Use the sentence frames on the back of your graphic organizer to help you.
 
Pre-AP Semester 1 Final: SCR #1 Prompt:
How did the hardship Alexander Hamilton experienced early in his life impact his character?
---Focus on ONE significant character trait Hamilton exhibits.  
---Refer to TWO different events from his life before departing to America.
---Use TWO quotes connecting these life events to this characteristic
 
Before writing:
---Think about all the events Miranda brings up from Hamilton’s early life in the song, then pick just TWO that you feel have the most impact.
---Think about all the traits Miranda uses to describe Hamilton in the song, then pick just ONE that Miranda emphasizes above the rest.
---Make a connection between this trait and the two events.  If no connection exists, start over with either a new trait or a new set of quotes.
---Find quotes from the song that support the trait you’ve chosen to focus on.
 
 
Assignment 2 of 5:
Revise/Add answers to the following questions in the form of annotations on your copy of "The Hamilton Mixtape".  
 
What is Miranda setting up in the first four lines?
How does Hamilton set himself apart in this "forgotten spot"?  Use lines 5-15.
What major event happened to him as a teen and what was his response?  Use lines 16-22.
What happened once his community learned of his response?  Use lines 23-25.
What message comes across about Hamilton in lines 29-30?
What hardships did Hamilton face as a kid?  Use lines 31-38.
How did Hamilton "fend for [himself]" in lines 41-52?
Why do you think Miranda makes a point of describing Hamilton as an immigrant in lines 52-57?
What point is Miranda making through Aaron Burr's declarations in the hook?  Use lines 58-68 and connect what Burr says about Hamilton in the hook to the theme.
 
 
Assignment 3 of 5:
 
Prepare to turn in all the graphic organizers from Units 1 and 2 for extra credit next week (due date TBD).
 
-Graphic Organizer for “Bread”
-Graphic Organizer for “The First Day”
-Graphic Organizer for “What Happened During the Ice Storm”
-Graphic Organizer for “Lamb to the Slaughter”
-Graphic Organizer for “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”
-Graphic Organizer for “Désirée’s Baby”
-Graphic Organizer for “Sonata for Harp and Bicycle”
-Graphic Organizer for “The Fight” (vulnerability of the eggs)
-Graphic Organizer for “The Hamilton Mixtape”
 
 
Assignment 4 of 5:
Start studying for your finals.  That means rereading every text since August and studying your notes on each (annotations, definitions, Do Nows, graphic organizers, etc.).  A list of every text and the types of questions you may be asked will be posted to Google Classroom by the end of this week.
 
Your multiple-choice final will be 50 questions long, with 2-5 questions for each of the texts we've read this year.  You will also have 2-4 questions on the material you studied for the Narrative Elements Quiz.  Questions will require you to know what happens in each story and be able to analyze passages from the text.  You will be allowed a 2x3" index card with notes for this portion of the text (a few students will earn the right to a larger index card--details to come).
 
You will write two CEL paragraphs on "The Hamilton Mixtape" as the written portion of your final.  The first paragraph will be worked on in the classes leading up to finals week.  The second will be completed the day of the final.  For the second, you will have access to your paragraph outline and annotated copy of the text.  I reserve the right to deny you access to either or both of these if you break the rules governing their use (wait for further information on this closer to finals week).
 
 
Assignment 5 of 5:
If you have not turned in the following assignments before Thursday the 15th/Friday the 16th (or if they did not receive passing grades), please make sure you turn them in on or by next Monday/Tuesday (Dec. 3rd/4th):
 
Literary Analysis Paragraph for "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"
Two-Paragraph Gothic Elements Analysis
Found Poem using "What Happened During the Ice Storm"
Google Slides Presentation Analyzing "What Happened During the Ice Storm" and "The Fight"
Achieve 3000 Lesson 1: "The Brain Question"  up to Step 3 (Link: https://portal.achieve3000.com/kb/lesson/?lid=6113&step=11&c=1&asn=)
Achieve 3000 Lesson 2: "Better Than Nature?" up to Step 5 (Link:
https://portal.achieve3000.com/kb/lesson/?lid=5933&step=10&c=1&asn=1)
List-Group-Label Definitions for "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and "Désirée's Baby"
Google Slides Presentations on Theme in the Heynen and Montague texts.
 
NOTE:
Please understand that the semester is practically over and you will have very limited opportunities once we return from break to raise your grade.  The only opportunities you may have will be the recent Illuminate Quick Check, Interim 2s, and the final.
 
If redoing a written assignment, it should be clear that you need to redo the quotes and the explanations.  Simply fixing the grammar is not going to make much of a difference in your grade if nothing else gets fixed.
 
I am available over break via email.  Don't hesitate to reach out if you have questions.
 

Homework due Wednesday the 28th

Assignment 1 of 4: 
Answer the following questions in the form of annotations on your copy of "The Hamilton Mixtape".  Most of these we went over in class but if we did not get through all of them, make sure you have answers by Wednesday.
 
What is Miranda setting up in the first four lines?
How does Hamilton set himself apart in this "forgotten spot"?  Use lines 5-15.
What major event happened to him as a teen and what was his response?  Use lines 16-22.
What happened once his community learned of his response?  Use lines 23-25.
What message comes across about Hamilton in lines 29-30?
What hardships did Hamilton face as a kid?  Use lines 31-38.
How did Hamilton "fend for [himself]" in lines 41-52?
Why do you think Miranda makes a point of describing Hamilton as an immigrant in lines 52-57?
What point is Miranda making through Aaron Burr's declarations in the hook?  Use lines 58-68.
 
 
Assignment 2 of 4:
Finish the graphic organizer for "The Hamilton Mixtape" by our next class.  
 
Add THREE+ quotes (with line numbers) that represent major life events with an impact on Hamilton's character.
 
Use your three examples of major life events above to write 1-2 sentences describing what Hamilton's early life must've been like based on these life events.
 
Add THREE+ quotes (with lines numbers) that showcase a notable character trait Hamilton exhibits.
 
 
Assignment 3 of 4:
Start studying for your finals.  That means rereading every text since August and studying your notes on each (annotations, definitions, Do Nows, graphic organizers, etc.).  A list of every text and the types of questions you may be asked will be posted to Google Classroom by the end of this week.
 
Your multiple-choice final will be 50 questions long, with 2-5 questions for each of the texts we've read this year.  You will also have 2-4 questions on the material you studied for the Narrative Elements Quiz.  Questions will require you to know what happens in each story and be able to analyze passages from the text.  You will be allowed a 2x3" index card with notes for this portion of the text (a few students will earn the right to a larger index card--details to come).
 
You will write two CEL paragraphs on "The Hamilton Mixtape" as the written portion of your final.  The first paragraph will be worked on in the classes leading up to finals week.  The second will be completed the day of the final.  For the second, you will have access to your paragraph outline and annotated copy of the text.  I reserve the right to deny you access to either or both of these if you break the rules governing their use (wait for further information on this closer to finals week).
 
 
Assignment 4 of 4:
If you have not turned in the following assignments before Thursday the 15th/Friday the 16th (or if they did not receive passing grades), please make sure you turn them in on or by next Monday/Tuesday (Dec. 3rd/4th):
 
Literary Analysis Paragraph for "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"
Two-Paragraph Gothic Elements Analysis
Found Poem using "What Happened During the Ice Storm"
Google Slides Presentation Analyzing "What Happened During the Ice Storm" and "The Fight"
Achieve 3000 Lesson 1: "The Brain Question"  up to Step 3 (Link: https://portal.achieve3000.com/kb/lesson/?lid=6113&step=11&c=1&asn=)
Achieve 3000 Lesson 2: "Better Than Nature?" up to Step 5 (Link:
https://portal.achieve3000.com/kb/lesson/?lid=5933&step=10&c=1&asn=1)
List-Group-Label Definitions for "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and "Désirée's Baby"
Google Slides Presentations on Theme in the Heynen and Montague texts.
 
NOTE:
Please understand that the semester is practically over and you will have very limited opportunities once we return from break to raise your grade.  The only opportunities you may have will be the recent Illuminate Quick Check, Interim 2s, and the final.
 
If redoing a written assignment, it should be clear that you need to redo the quotes and the explanations.  Simply fixing the grammar is not going to make much of a difference in your grade if nothing else gets fixed.
 
I am available over break via email.  Don't hesitate to reach out if you have questions.
 

Homework due Monday the 26th/Tuesday the 27th

**NOTE: If you have been working hard to make every deadline and turn in every assignment on time, you deserve a break.  Therefore, you will have no homework for the coming week except to bring your Pre-AP Reader for Unit 2.  Otherwise ...
 
Assignment 1 of 1: 
If you have not turned in the following assignments before Thursday the 15th/Friday the 16th (or if they did not receive passing grades), please make sure you work on them over Thanksgiving break:
 
Literary Analysis Paragraph for "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"
Two-Paragraph Gothic Elements Analysis
Found Poem using "What Happened During the Ice Storm"
Google Slides Presentation Analyzing "What Happened During the Ice Storm" and "The Fight"
Achieve 3000 Lesson 1: "The Brain Question"  up to Step 3 (Link: https://portal.achieve3000.com/kb/lesson/?lid=6113&step=11&c=1&asn=)
Achieve 3000 Lesson 2: "Better Than Nature?" up to Step 5 (Link:
https://portal.achieve3000.com/kb/lesson/?lid=5933&step=10&c=1&asn=1)
 
I will even let you still turn in your definitions for "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and "Désirée's Baby" if you finish them.
 
NOTE:
Please understand that the semester is practically over and you will have very limited opportunities once we return from break to raise your grade.  The only opportunities you may have will be the Illuminate Quick Check done in class this past Tuesday/Wednesday, Interim 2, and the final.
 
If redoing a written assignment, it should be clear that you need to redo the quotes and the explanations.  Simply fixing the grammar is not going to make much of a difference in your grade if nothing else gets fixed.
 
I am available over break via email.  Don't hesitate to reach out if you have questions.
 

Homework due Monday the 12th/Tuesday the 13th

**Bring your Pre-AP Reader for Unit 2 to every class from now on.
 
Assignment 1 of 3: 
 
Work on your slides for the Google Slides Presentation.  Remember, your job is to show how specific language in both texts ("What Happened During the Ice Storm" and "The Fight") connects to the shared theme we went over in class.
 
You will have some time on Tuesday/Wednesday to finalize this presentation but please remember it is due by 11:59 p.m. that night.  Don't forget to upload!
 
Make sure you ...
-Each have access to the same Google Slides presentation (i.e., share the slides with each other)
-Each pick ONE text to focus on.  If you're working alone, you do both.
-Have a sentence that accurately expresses the theme of both texts on Slide 2.
-Have two quotes (and explanations) showing why the pheasants are vulnerable on Slide 3
-Have two quotes (and explanations) showing why the eggs are vulnerable on Slide 6
-Have two quotes from each text that show characters following different impulses on Slides 4-5 and 7-8
-Have explanations that include analysis of specific words from each quote on Slides 4-5 and 7-8
-Have cited every quote properly (cite by paragraph for "What Happened ..." and by line for "The Fight")
-Have cited all images you use that are not yours (i.e., from the Internet) on Slide 9 
 
 
Assignment 2 of 3:
 
Complete ALL FIVE STEPS of the Achieve 3000 lesson "Better Than Nature?" by 11:59 p.m. on Thursday the 15th/Friday the 16th.
 
 
Assignment Breakdown:
Before Reading Poll: One sentence explaining why you agree or disagree.
Read the article: Write TWO summaries (middle, end) and THREE quiz questions (beginning, middle, end).
After Reading Poll: Choose either "agree" or "disagree"
Thought Question: Write a one-paragraph letter explaining why you think the FDA should (or should not) allow products from genetically engineered animals to be sold in stores.
 
 
Assignment 3 of 3 (ongoing):
The following past assignments (excluding tests) can still be completed for late credit:
 
Achieve 3000 Lesson for "The Brain Question" (up to step 3, see postings from September for weblink)
Handouts for: "Bread", "The First Day", "What Happened During the Ice Storm", "The Red Fox Fur Coat", "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge", "Lottery", "The Fight"
Literary Analysis Paragraph for "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" (by 11/26-27)
Literary Analysis Paragraphs on Gothic Elements (by 11/26-27)
Found Poem assignment (by 11/26-27)

Homework due Thursday the 8th/Friday the 9th

**Bring your Pre-AP Reader for Unit 2 to every class from now on.
 
Assignment 1 of 3: 
Finish typing a final draft of your found poem for Jim Heylen's "What Happened During the Ice Storm" as well as a five-sentence reflection paragraph explaining the choices you made in your poem.  
 
STAPLING ORDER: typed final draft (with hand-drawn illustration), typed reflection paragraph, rough draft, rubric.
 
NOTE ON TYPING: Please double-space and number the lines of your poem.  You can choose a different font/font size for the poem but should keep the reflection paragraph in Times New Roman 12-point font.
 
Keep in mind:
-Your poem should focus on a specific idea from the original (see handout)
-You should ONLY be using words from the 1-2 paragraphs of the story you've decided to focus on
-Your poem needs to be 15 lines long, minimum, and 3 words per line.
-You can break the three-words-per-line rule ONLY three times in the poem
-You are NOT allowed to just print off an illustration from the Internet.
-Your reflection paragraph should explain ALL of the following: why you kept specific words, why you cut specific words, why you structured the poem the way you did (added repetition, broke up lines the way you did)
 
 
Assignment 2 of 3:
Bring the definitions your wrote for the List-Group-Label activities we did with "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and "Désirée's Baby" ... They will be checked during class Thursday/Friday and entered into Pinnacle as a "participation" grade. 
 
 
 
Assignment 3 of 3 (ongoing):
The following past assignments (excluding tests) can still be completed for late credit:
 
Achieve 3000 Lesson for "The Brain Question" (up to step 3, see postings from September for weblink)
Handouts for: "Bread", "The First Day", "What Happened During the Ice Storm", "The Red Fox Fur Coat", "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge", "Lottery", "The Fight"
Literary Analysis Paragraph for "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" (by 11/26-27)
Literary Analysis Paragraphs on Gothic Elements (by 11/26-27)